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Life Insurance Appraisal Brings Confidence to Planning

December 8th, 2020 No comments
Paying for a policy appraisal can have a great return on investment.

Recently, the attorney for a family office asked for my help with a situation. The family wanted to transfer/sell two $10 million survivor life policies to another trust for planning purposes. The policy owner went to the two insurance carriers to ask for the 712 values or Interpolated Terminal Reserve (ITR). Though the two policies had the same death benefit on the same couple issued at the same time for the same kind of policy, the numbers came back very different from the two insurance carriers, each of which is one of the top rated and recognized carriers in the market.

A Difference of Opinion

The cash value of each policy was roughly $1.5 million, and one carrier came back with a number exactly the same as the cash value and even stated on its communication “Please note that ABC Life uses the Net Cash Value as a proxy for the ITR.” The other carrier came back with $3 million.. For full post, click here…

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Success Stories: Policy Appraisal Brings Confidence to Planning

November 24th, 2020 No comments

Recently I was brought a situation by a family office through their attorney.  The family wants to transfer/sell two $10,000,000 survivor life policies to another trust for planning purposes.  The policy owner went to the two insurance carriers to ask for the 712 values or Interpolated Terminal Reserve (ITR).  Though the two policies w

ere the same death benefit on the same couple issued at the same time for the same kind of policy, the numbers came back very, very different from the two insurance carriers, each of which is one of the top rated and recognized carriers in the market.

The cash value of each policy was roughly $1,500,000 and one carrier came back with a number exactly the same as the cash value and even stated on their communication “Please note that ABC Life uses the Net Cash Value as a proxy for the ITR.”  However, the other carrier came back with a $3,000,000 number. For full post, click here…

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Comparing Term Life Insurance Policies

November 18th, 2020 No comments

Though the following piece I wrote on term insurance with Professor Gregg Dimkoff may seem very basic, sometimes it’s the basics that bear reviewing so we don’t miss something while focusing on the “high end” stuff.  In numerous recent situations clients have suffered significant harm because the basics weren’t a focus.  Also, the market is changing and we can’t take for granted our old assumptions are still accurate.  Enjoy.

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The Worst Life Insurance Deal Ever – Annual Renewable Term

October 27th, 2020 No comments

Why your client should never buy annual renewable term.

I’ve written about how expensive association term and group term is, how poor the policy features are and the tremendous amount of money that can be saved by going with a better underwritten product. But there’s another term insurance situation that’s even more insidious in my estimation. Annual renewable term (ART) or yearly renewable term (YRT) can take the cake.

Creeping Up Premiums

This was brought back to me vividly during a recent client conversation. An attorney had a $750,000 ART term policy, and his wife had one for $550,000. The premiums were only about $500 and $300, respectively, which isn’t much money for a couple making the income they do. However, let’s look forward a bit.

They’re in the seventh year of their policies, which already tells me a lot. By the second or third year, most ART policies already exceed the premium of a 10-year level term product. In 10 years the premiums on his and hers, respectively, are $1,200 and $700. In 20 years, they’re $2,900 and $1,700. In 30 years, the numbers are $6,800 and $3,400. Of course, almost no one plans on keeping an ART in force for many years, but plans don’t always pan out. What I see too often is that ART that was so cheap in the early years, like association term, has a premium that slowly creeps up without anyone noticing. It’s like the proverbial frog in the water on the stove. 

I’ve seen cases in which the ART had been in force for over 20 years. Even this one at seven years is a travesty. For this couple, a new 20-year level policy with a high-quality, well-respected insurance carrier issuing policies with very good contractual features would cost less every year for the next 20 years than the existing ART will cost this year. Ten years from now, the 20-year level term premium will be less than half the ART premium, and in 20 years, it will be less than 20% of the ART premium. The savings are ridiculous.

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Beware… of Inforce Illustrations and Loans

October 22nd, 2020 No comments

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Insuring Life Insurance

October 13th, 2020 No comments

Clients should create their own disclaimers.

Consumers procure life insurance for protection, but do they need to be protected from it at the same time? Too often the answer is yes. Maybe it’s because I’m on the consulting side of the market that train wrecks disproportionately end up on my desk.

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The Most Important Thing to Understand Regarding Premium Financing: Are the Numbers Real? By Bill Boersma

September 16th, 2020 No comments

Given the number of premium financing cases that I review, in force and proposed, I’ve seen much of what’s out there and have a good grasp of the level of understanding in the consumer market. There’s one overriding commonality I see again and again, and until this is taken care of, there will continue to be problems: Are the numbers customers see real?

As I’ve written before, I’m not against premium financing. If I was, I wouldn’t have a mortgage on my house. I don’t pay off a 3% mortgage because I’m confident that I can do better over time in the market or invest that money back into my company, other real estate or whatever I believe I can invest in at better than 3%. Returns elsewhere that are better than my mortgage rate effectively discount the cost of the house. For full post, click here…

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Do Life Insurance Dividends and Crediting Rates Mean Anything?

September 8th, 2020 1 comment

It’s time to separate fact from fiction.

If I hear another policy owner touting the rate of return he’s getting on his policy cash value, I might scream.

Few policy owners have any idea what they’re talking about. All they’re saying is what the agent told them, and they haven’t even taken out a calculator to check the numbers.

Let’s look at a recently run traditional mutual whole life (WL) policy presented to me. The carrier is a big name and respected company with a

current dividend rate at better than 6%. The internal rate of return on the premium to the cash value at 10 years is negative 3.2%. At 15 years, it’s about 0%. At 25 years, or age 70, it’s 3.5%. It never hit 4%.

Expenses Need to Be Considered

There’s nothing wrong with this, and it’s a perfectly fine policy. However, don’t tell me you’re getting 6% on your cash value because you’re not. That’s not even how WL works. The cash value, let alone your premium, just doesn’t grow at the stated dividend rate. I mean, seriously, where do you think the expenses are paid from? Of course, not everyone thinks this and not every, or even most, agents misrepresent it, but enough do so it needs to be talked about. For full post, click here…

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Indexed Universal Life: Back Testing and Cap Rates and Averages, Oh My!

July 30th, 2020 1 comment

In a recent engagement, an agent trying to convince a client to enter a premium financed indexed universal life (IUL) transaction was touting returns on his own IUL policy over the past decade or so.  I found a number of aspects of this peculiar.  One was that he was touting the average interest rate on his own policy, which has happened to be in force during the longest bull market in U.S. history.  This was supposedly a reason the product was so great and could/might actually outperform the crediting rate of the sales ledger, which I already deem to be too aggressive based on significant objective data.

Another oddity is that he evidently doesn’t understand the difference between an average interest rate and the internal rate of return (IRR), which is the difference between an arithmetic mean and a geometric mean.  The geometric mean will generally be lower, and it’s the number any sensible person would use when evaluating an investment.  As an example, what if you get a 0% rate of return for three years and then a 40% return in the fourth year?  The average rate of return is 10% but the IRR is 8.78%.  It’s respectable but not accurate.  No one would reasonably look at the track record of this product as 10%.

Next, the agent was sharing past rates of return that are higher than currently possible due to falling cap rates.  In an IUL product, the cap rate is the highest crediting rate possible regardless of the actual index return.  On the flip side, there’s a minimum, often 0%.  Therefore the product is postured as having upside potential with downside protection.  This is not untrue but rather misleading without a full discussion of internal policy fees and charges and what’s going on with caps. For full post, click here…

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Video: Funding a Buy-Sell Agreement with Life Insurance

July 28th, 2020 No comments

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